WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises

A growing number of House Democrats called for the beginning of an impeachment inquiry after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE did not exonerate President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump tweets ICE will begin removing 'millions' of undocumented migrants MORE in his first public comments about his investigation.

Mueller emphasized that Department of Justice regulations prevented his team from bringing charges against a president in office, and that "if we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so."

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The special counsel also alluded to impeachment, stating “that the Constitution requires a process other than the criminal justice system to formally accuse a sitting president of wrongdoing.”

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCalifornia Democrat in swing district calls for Trump impeachment inquiry California Democrat in swing district calls for Trump impeachment inquiry Overnight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments MORE (D-Calif.) has long resisted impeachment and she signaled her position had not changed in the wake of Mueller's appearance, saying the House would focus on investigations and legislation.

But for several Democrats, Mueller's statements were a game changer. The Democrats now calling for the opening of an impeachment inquiry include Reps. Brendan Boyle (Pa.), Betty McCollumBetty Louise McCollumHouse Dems call on Trump to cancel plans to speak at July Fourth celebration House Dems call on Trump to cancel plans to speak at July Fourth celebration Mueller puts ball in Democrats' court MORE (Minn.) and Rep. Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHillicon Valley: Lawmakers angered over Border Patrol breach | Senate Dems press FBI over Russian hacking response | Emails reportedly show Zuckerberg knew of Facebook's privacy issues | FCC looks to improve broadband mapping Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers angered over Border Patrol breach | Senate Dems press FBI over Russian hacking response | Emails reportedly show Zuckerberg knew of Facebook's privacy issues | FCC looks to improve broadband mapping Democrats grill FEMA over inflated payments for Hurricane Maria MORE (Miss.), the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Calls for impeachment previously rose after former White House counsel Don McGahn defied a subpoena and failed to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. 

Days earlier, Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashJohn Oliver advocates Trump impeachment inquiry for 'high crimes and misdemeanors' John Oliver advocates Trump impeachment inquiry for 'high crimes and misdemeanors' The Hill's Morning Report - Is US weighing military action against Iran? MORE (Mich.) became the first Republican to say Trump had engaged in impeachable conduct.

Some Democrats have signed on to a resolution from Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data House Democrats question DHS over using facial recognition tech on US citizens MORE (D-Mich.) that calls on the Judiciary Committee to inquire whether the House should impeach Trump.

Here's a tally of which lawmakers have endorsed launching an impeachment inquiry of President Trump.

This list will be updated.

 

Democrats calling for impeachment inquiry (62)

 

Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsHarris introduces bill to combat racial bias in maternal health care WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (N.C.)

"Impeachment is not off the table. However, before we move forward the American people deserve all the facts. That is why I support an impeachment inquiry. Congress has a sacred responsibility to obtain the information necessary to determine the next steps," Adams said in a statement two days after Mueller's remarks.

 

Nanette Barragán (Calif.)

A spokeswoman for Barragán confirmed to The Hill that the California Democrat supports an impeachment inquiry.

 

Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyA true believer in diversity, inclusion On The Money: US banks see profits rise | Pelosi 'optimistic' on infrastructure deal with Trump | Former Black Caucus staffers flex clout on K Street Former Congressional Black Caucus staffers flex clout on K Street MORE (Ohio)

"I support Congress continuing to use our oversight and investigative tools to get to the bottom of any wrongdoing. I ultimately believe this process will lead to an impeachment inquiry, which I would support for the people and to keep America great," Beatty said in a statement on May 31.
 
 
Don Beyer (Va.)

“For me, the final two straws were Don McGahn refusing to come forward after a perfectly reasonable request for him to appear and then [Treasury Secretary Steven] Mnuchin writing us back saying he’s not going to honor the subpoena on Trump’s tax returns when the law is crystal clear,” Beyer told The Hill.



Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerFirst major 'Medicare for All' hearing sharpens attacks on both sides First major 'Medicare for All' hearing sharpens attacks on both sides Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz MORE (Ore.)

Blumenauer signed on to Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises DeVos defends controversial guidance on transgender students MORE (Ore.)

"The House of Representatives must begin an impeachment inquiry," Bonamici tweeted.

 

Brendan Boyle (Pa.)

"It’s clear now that Congress must hold hearings on the findings of the Special Counsel, including the witnesses who gave testimony to investigators. It’s time to officially start Impeachment Hearings," Boyle tweeted on May 29 after Mueller spoke.

 

G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldNancy Pelosi fends off impeachment wave — for now House Democrats press leaders to start Trump impeachment WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (N.C.)

“The evidence that has been produced so far is sufficient in my opinion to support an impeachment inquiry and impeachment and removal,” Butterfield told McClatchy on May 30. “I am prepared to vote for an impeachment inquiry ... and I will vote for impeachment and removal.”

 

Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroTrump's border funding comes back from the dead House passes bill to protect 'Dreamers' House passes bill to protect 'Dreamers' MORE (Texas)

“It’s time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry. There is political risk in doing so, but there’s a greater risk to our country in doing nothing,” Castro tweeted. “This is a fight for our democracy.”

 

Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenJon Stewart excoriates lawmakers for skipping hearing on 9/11 victim fund Jon Stewart excoriates lawmakers for skipping hearing on 9/11 victim fund Democrats begin Mueller hearings with Watergate-era witness MORE (Tenn.)

Cohen introduced articles of impeachment in the last session of Congress that accused Trump of obstructing justice. “I think he's committed impeachable offenses and he ought to be impeached,” said Cohen, a Judiciary Committee member.

 

David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineOvernight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Pelosi: Congress will block Trump's arms sales to Saudi Arabia MORE (R.I.)

Cicilline, a member of Democratic leadership and the House Judiciary Committee, called for starting an impeachment inquiry if McGahn didn't appear for the hearing.

“If Don McGahn does not testify tomorrow, it will be time to begin an impeachment inquiry of @realDonaldTrump,” Cicilline tweeted on the eve of McGahn's absence from the Judiciary Committee hearing.

 

Danny K. Davis (Ill.)

Davis announced on May 28 that he would sign on to Tlaib's resolution, saying that "I believe it is time" that the House begin an impeachment inquiry. "President Trump’s actions are challenging the very essence of our democracy," Davis said in a statement.

 

Madeleine DeanMadeleine DeanDemocrats face voters clamoring for impeachment Pelosi, Nadler tangle on impeachment, contempt vote Democrats talk subpoena for Mueller MORE (Pa.)

Dean, a member of the Judiciary Committee, in an appearance on MSNBC's "Hardball," said she backed launching an impeachment inquiry.

 

Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGetteBipartisan former EPA chiefs say Trump administration has abandoned agency's mission Congress: Expand access to physical therapy for underserved communities Overnight Energy: EPA to reconsider cost benefit analysis of air pollution rules | Interior gets new rules on free concert tickets | Dem challenges EPA for skipping hearing MORE (Colo.)

“The facts laid out in the Mueller report, coupled with this administration’s ongoing attempts to stonewall Congress, leave us no other choice: It is time for Congress to officially launch an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States,” DeGette tweeted. She formally signed on to Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita Demings2020 Democrats mark three years since Pulse nightclub shooting 2020 Democrats mark three years since Pulse nightclub shooting Florida lawmakers propose making Pulse nightclub a national memorial MORE (Fla.)

Demings, a Judiciary Committee member, said last month after the Mueller report's release that “I think we have enough” to move forward with impeachment. “I think we have great evidence that the president has blatantly violated so many laws. It’s just ridiculous,” Demings said during a Democratic caucus conference call. 

 

Mark DeSaulnierMark James DeSaulnierCummings accuses Education Dept of blocking probe into attempted removal of internal watchdog WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (Calif.)

"Congress must do its job, which includes overriding the DOJ policy that protects the president under any circumstance, and beginning an impeachment inquiry," DeSaulnier said in a statement after Mueller's May 29 appearance.

 

 
Doggett's office confirmed to The Hill that he supports opening an impeachment inquiry. “What Mueller thought he could not do, Congress can no longer avoid," Doggett said in a statement.
 
 
 

“I personally feel like we cannot tolerate this level of obstruction, that if we do, then we have lowered the bar to the point where any criminal can be president of the United States and that should be unacceptable to all of us,” tweeted Escobar, a Judiciary Committee member. “I believe we need to begin an impeachment inquiry.”

 

Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralLawmakers congratulate US women's soccer team on winning opening World Cup match Lawmakers congratulate US women's soccer team on winning opening World Cup match WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (N.Y.)

"We cannot slow down – the American people deserve the truth, and @realDonaldTrump deserves to be held accountable for his actions. #Impeach" Espaillat tweeted on May 29 after Mueller delivered his statement. Espaillat also previously cosponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) Michael EvansWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises Ten Dem lawmakers added to House Ways and Means Committee MORE (Pa.)

"The heavily redacted #MuellerReport reveals and details repeated disturbing conduct by the president, & it shouldn't go unnoticed — an impeachment vote would begin the process & allow House Judiciary to have broader investigative availability, which is certainly warranted!" Evans tweeted.

 

Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeFederal employees turn their backs on Agriculture secretary after relocation plans announced Federal employees turn their backs on Agriculture secretary after relocation plans announced Lawmakers clash after Dem reads letter on House floor calling Trump supporters 'racist,' 'dumb' MORE (Ohio)

Fudge signed onto Tlaib's resolution on June 6. She also cosponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Chuy GarciaJesus (Chuy) GarciaWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises Pelosi joins other Dem leaders in support of Chicago Symphony Orchestra strikers MORE (Ill.)

“After careful consideration and deliberation, I’ve come to the conclusion that the House of Representatives must execute its constitutionally mandated responsibility and begin a formal inquiry,” Garcia told WBEZ in an interview on May 28.

 

Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenWe can do right by the planet and the economy Congress should make Interior's Bernhardt 'manage the land to stop climate change' The Pentagon emits more greenhouse gases than Sweden: study MORE (Texas)

Green has been a vocal supporter of impeachment since 2017. He forced two House floor votes on impeachment in 2017 and 2018 while Republicans held the majority and has threatened to force a third.

 

Raul Grijalva (Ariz.)

"President Trump is not exonerated, and his administration is deliberately misleading the American people about the findings of the Special Counsel. If this isn’t a reason for an #ImpeachmentInquiryNow, I don’t know what is," Grijalva, the Natural Resources Committee chairman, tweeted hours after Mueller's statement.

 

Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments The Hill's Morning Report - Democrats wonder: Can Nadler handle the Trump probe? MORE (Calif.)

“The Constitution created our impeachment authority for exactly this kind of circumstance. And it's really damaging to the country and to our institutions if we punt on something like this,” Huffman told "PBS NewsHour" after the Mueller report became public. Huffman is a co-sponsor of Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalCentrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage push Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage push Overnight Health Care: Democratic bill would require insurance to cover OTC birth control | House Dems vote to overturn ban on fetal tissue research | New rule aims to expand health choices for small businesses MORE (Wash.)

“We are now at the point where we must begin an impeachment inquiry. I don't say that lightly. We've taken every step we can w/subpoenas and witnesses,” tweeted Jayapal, a Judiciary Committee member and Progressive Caucus leader.

 

Dan KildeeDaniel (Dan) Timothy KildeeDems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Democratic lawmaker says Trump isn't 'leaving us any choice' on impeachment MORE (Mich.)

Kildee, a chief deputy whip, came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign entities.

"[T]he president's actions have taken us to a moment where I believe Congress must open an impeachment inquiry to defend the rule of law," Kildee said in a statement. "And the President's recent comments welcoming and encouraging foreign interference in our elections were absolutely chilling. The President's statements are not only unpatriotic, they are illegal."

 

Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Democrats set stage for next shutdown fight with wall-free spending bill MORE (Calif.)

The California progressive, who is a member of the Democratic leadership team, co-sponsored Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Andy LevinAndrew (Andy) LevinHouse Democrats push to raise intern pay to per hour House Democrats push to raise intern pay to per hour Democratic rep says labor unions don't have to be in conflict with technology MORE (Mich.)

"When I became a member of the 116th Congress, I took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. Today, I announce that I have concluded that the House has a duty to open an impeachment inquiry into the conduct of President Donald J. Trump," Levin tweeted on June 15.

 

Ted LieuTed W. LieuDemocrats ask OSC to review whether Kushner violated Hatch Act Democrats ask OSC to review whether Kushner violated Hatch Act Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale MORE (Calif.)

Lieu echoed other fellow Judiciary Committee members in endorsing an inquiry. “This inquiry could lead to impeachment, or it could lead to nothing. But I think if McGahn doesn’t show, we have to at least start it,” Lieu told The Washington Post.

 

 
"Congress must hold [Trump] accountable. I believe the time has come to consider an impeachment inquiry," Lowenthal tweeted a day after Mueller's statement.

 

Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiCalifornia Democrat in swing district calls for Trump impeachment inquiry California Democrat in swing district calls for Trump impeachment inquiry Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale MORE (N.J.)

Malinowski, who represents a competitive swing district, told NBC News that he now supports an impeachment inquiry. "I’ve come to think that it is warranted at this point given what appears to be across-the-board defiance of congressional oversight and the rule of law by the administration," he said. 

Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyUS women's soccer team reignites equal pay push US women's soccer team reignites equal pay push New York congresswoman calls for helicopter ban after fatal crash MORE (N.Y.)

“I’ve been thinking about impeachment for a long time. It’s is not something that Congress, or our country, can undertake lightly - it’s a terrible, weighty thing," Maloney said at a rally on June 15. “After carefully reviewing evidence laid out in the Mueller Report, after attending numerous hearings, after listening to the concerns of my constituents, and after doing as much soul-searching as I’ve ever done in my life - it is my inescapable conclusion that the House of Representatives must open an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States."

Betty McCollum (Minn.)

"I fully expect the responsible House committees to expedite their investigations and, as soon as possible, formally draft articles of impeachment. It is my belief that the House of Representatives has an absolute obligation under the Constitution to hold a president accountable for illegal conduct, and that includes Mr. Trump," McCollum said in a statement after Mueller delivered his public statement on May 29.

 

Jim McGovern (Mass.)

McGovern, the chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee, endorsed impeachment after Mueller’s comments. “We’re beyond talking about this in terms of political implications. We have to do what’s right,” McGovern told WGBH. McGovern previously voted in favor of articles of impeachment offered by Green during the last Congress. He now chairs the committee closely aligned with leadership that controls how legislation is considered on the House floor. 

 

Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises Ex-White House ethics chief compares Ivanka, Kushner security clearances to college admissions scandal MORE (Wis.)

"President Trump has repeatedly demonstrated manifest disrespect for the office he holds, Congress, and the American people," Moore said, according to the AP. "I have long said that Trump should resign. Impeachment is not something that any of us take lightly, but we cannot shrink from our responsibilities either."

 

Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Biden, Sanders to share stage at first DNC debate The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Biden, Sanders to share stage at first DNC debate Biden, Sanders, Buttigieg to debate; Warren on separate night MORE (Mass.)

The presidential candidate backs an impeachment investigation. “I'm not calling for a vote on impeachment today. We don't have all the facts yet. But we should be getting those facts and making them transparent for the American people,” Moulton told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

 

 
A spokesman for Napolitano confirmed the California Democrat supports opening an impeachment inquiry. She also signed onto Tlaib's resolution on June 4.
 
 
Joseph Neguse (Colo.)

“The findings detailed in the Special Counsel’s report, and the Administration’s pattern of wholesale obstruction of Congress since the report’s release, make clear that it is time to open an impeachment inquiry,” Neguse, a Judiciary Committee member, tweeted after McGahn was a no-show.

 

Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use Overnight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use The Hill's Morning Report - Is US weighing military action against Iran? MORE (N.Y.)

Ocasio-Cortez signed on to Tlaib's resolution after the Justice Department released a partially redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russia's election interference that laid out 10 instances of Trump potentially obstructing justice.

“It is just as politicized a maneuver to not impeach in the face of overwhelming evidence as it is to impeach w/o cause,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted on May 21.

“Just as what happens in the House doesn’t control Senate, what happens in the Senate shouldn’t control the House,” she added.

 

Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar blasts Trump's comment about accepting foreign campaign dirt as 'un-American' Omar blasts Trump's comment about accepting foreign campaign dirt as 'un-American' Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data MORE (Minn.)

“We must begin impeachment proceedings and investigate if the president committed impeachable offenses,” Omar tweeted after the Mueller report's release. She also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution. 

 

Chellie PingreeRochelle (Chellie) PingreeFederal employees turn their backs on Agriculture secretary after relocation plans announced Federal employees turn their backs on Agriculture secretary after relocation plans announced Congress should make Interior's Bernhardt 'manage the land to stop climate change' MORE (Maine)

“As dozens of serious investigations into President Trump and his business interests are underway in state + federal courts, it is in the public interest that Congress continue its own investigations in the face of unprecedented obstruction and move toward an impeachment inquiry,” Pingree tweeted after Mueller’s public appearance.

 

Mark PocanMark William PocanOn The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill On The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage push MORE (Wis.)

“Stonewalling Congress on witnesses and the unredacted Mueller report only enhances the President’s appearance of guilt, and as a result, he has pushed Congress to a point where we must start an impeachment inquiry,” tweeted Pocan, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

 

Katie Porter (Calif.)

“After weeks of study, deliberation and conversations with Orange County families, I’ve decided to support an impeachment investigation of the president,” Porter said in a video statement she sent out on Twitter.

 

Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyCruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control access face major obstacles Ocasio-Cortez shares verse by the 'Congressional Destiny's Child' in promotion of new birth control legislation Ocasio-Cortez shares verse by the 'Congressional Destiny's Child' in promotion of new birth control legislation MORE (Mass.)

Pressley is also a co-sponsor of Tlaib's resolution. “There's a lack of moral fortitude and fitness to even be in this office,” Pressley told Boston Public Radio. “I think what we have seen that is unredacted in this report relative to examples of obstruction of justice also gives us the legal grounds.”

 

Mike QuigleyMichael (Mike) Bruce QuigleyDems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Democrats lash out at Trump's bombshell remarks MORE (Ill.)

“The President’s unacceptable obstruction and his abuses of power have left Congress only one option to fulfill our Constitutional responsibilities: We must open an impeachment inquiry,” Quigley tweeted the day after Mueller’s appearance. “What the Special Counsel was saying is that the ball is in Congress’s court.”

 

Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Congress and contempt: What you need to know MORE (Md.)

Raskin, a member of the Judiciary Committee and the Oversight and Reform Committee, told The Washington Post that “the logic of an impeachment inquiry is pretty overwhelming at this point.” 

 

Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceDemocrat offers measure to prevent lawmakers from sleeping in their offices Democrat offers measure to prevent lawmakers from sleeping in their offices Hillicon Valley: Pelosi blasts Facebook for not taking down doctored video | Democrats push election security after Mueller warning | Critics dismiss FCC report on broadband access | Uber to ban passengers with low ratings MORE (N.Y.)

Rice said on Twitter that "Congress has a moral obligation to put our politics aside and take action," calling on lawmakers to begin impeachment hearings. The New York lawmaker had opposed Pelosi's bid for Speakership.

 

Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondLawmakers demand answers on Border Patrol data breach Lawmakers demand answers on Border Patrol data breach Democrats keep censure for Trump on the table MORE (La.)

A spokeswoman confirmed to The Hill that Richmond, a Judiciary Committee member and former Black Caucus chairman, "does support starting an impeachment inquiry."

 

Bobby RushBobby Lee RushChicago reopens dozens of cold cases with aid of computer algorithm WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (Ill.)

“Congressman Rush believes that President Trump should be impeached,” a spokesperson for Rush told WBEZ. “Congress has a responsibility to protect the constitutional foundation of our government with respect for the laws of this great nation. We must not forget that no one is above the law.”

 

Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John Ryan2020 Democrat: Harriet Tubman will be on 'within the first year of my presidency' 2020 Democrat: Harriet Tubman will be on 'within the first year of my presidency' Democratic presidential hopefuls react to debate placement MORE (Ohio)

“When you think that the president has committed crimes — and I’ve read the Mueller report and think he obstructed [justice] on multiple occasions — we have a responsibility," Ryan, who is running for president, said during a CNN town hall on June 2.

 

Mary Gay ScanlonMary Gay ScanlonGOP leader, Ocasio-Cortez give boost to lawmaker pay hike GOP leader, Ocasio-Cortez give boost to lawmaker pay hike Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage MORE (Pa.)

“No one is above the law. The time has come to start an impeachment inquiry because the American people deserve to know the truth and to have the opportunity to judge the gravity of the evidence and charges leveled against the president,” Scanlon, the Judiciary Committee's vice chairwoman, said in a statement after McGahn declined to show up for Tuesday’s hearing. 

 

Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierOvernight Defense: Trump hails D-Day veterans in Normandy | Trump, Macron downplay rift on Iran | Trump mourns West Point cadet's death in accident | Pentagon closes review of deadly Niger ambush Trump hails D-Day veterans in Normandy: 'You are the pride of our nation' Trump hails D-Day veterans in Normandy: 'You are the pride of our nation' MORE (Calif.)

“I believe that an inquiry into impeachment is required at this point in time,” Speier, a member of the Oversight and Reform Committee, told CNN's “New Day.”

 

Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (Ariz.)

Stanton, a Judiciary Committee member, endorsed opening an impeachment inquiry a day after Mueller broke his silence. "It is time for the House of Representatives to move to the next stages of holding the President accountable, including the extraordinary step of opening an impeachment inquiry. This is a conclusion I reached only recently, and not one I reached lightly," Stanton said in a statement.

 

Eric SwalwellEric Michael Swalwell2020 Democrat: Trump is a national security risk 2020 Democrat: Trump is a national security risk Campaign dads fit fatherhood between presidential speeches MORE (Calif.)

"Congress has no choice: we must begin an impeachment inquiry against @realDonaldTrump. He has invited the Russians to again sabotage our elections. And he has obstructed (& obstructs) justice. Time to be held accountable. Our democracy is worth saving," Swalwell tweeted June 13 after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign governments. Swalwell is a Judiciary Committee member and is running for president. 

 

Bennie Thompson (Miss.)

The House Homeland Security Committee chairman said after Mueller spoke that "I support impeachment."  "The special counsel did not give any indication that the president is innocent," Thompson said in a statement. "Therefore, it is time for Congress to perform its oversight duties." Thompson previously voted twice in favor of articles of impeachment from Green in 2017 and 2018 on the House floor.

 

Rashida Tlaib (Mich.)

In addition to her impeachment inquiry resolution, Tlaib drew attention on her first day as a member of Congress in January for pledging to a crowd of supporters that “we're going to impeach the motherf---er.”

 

Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoBipartisan senators propose forcing EPA to set drinking water standard for 'forever chemicals' Bipartisan senators propose forcing EPA to set drinking water standard for 'forever chemicals' Overnight Energy: Measure would force EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in water | Emails show Trump official consulted climate deniers | Democrats urge Puerto Rico to reject debt deal for power company MORE (N.Y.)

"After careful review of the evidence and testimony currently available, and in service to my oath, it is my judgment that Congress needs to accept the baton being handed to us by now former Special Counsel Mueller and open an impeachment inquiry to more fully assess the Constitutional implications of seemingly criminal actions by the President and his campaign, and to determine whether formal impeachment charges need to be filed," Tonko wrote in a series of tweets five days after Mueller's on-camera statement.

 

Norma TorresNorma Judith TorresDemocratic rep says she's tired of 'sex-starved males' talking about abortion rights Democratic rep says she's tired of 'sex-starved males' talking about abortion rights WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (Calif.)

"I think there is enough evidence in front of us to move forward," Torres told The Washington Post after the Mueller report's release. 

 

Juan VargasJuan C. Vargas ICE does not know how many veterans it has deported, watchdog says ICE does not know how many veterans it has deported, watchdog says Pelosi employs committee chairs to tamp down calls for Trump impeachment MORE (Calif.)

Vargas told The Hill on Wednesday that he supports the impeachment inquiry. "I think we should start the impeachment process. … I think it gets us to a place where we can get this information, and then frankly be able to make a determination."

 

Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises Border Dems introduce bill to process refugee claims in Central America MORE (Texas)

Vela has signed on to Tlaib's resolution calling for an impeachment inquiry.

 

Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersFive memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House Five memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments MORE (Calif.)

Waters was one of the first Democrats to call for Trump's impeachment. Waters told CNN in a recent interview that Trump has “done everything that one could even think of to be eligible for impeachment.”

 

John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Overnight Health Care: Biden infuriates abortion-rights groups with stance on Hyde Amendment | Trump tightens restrictions on fetal tissue research | Democrats plan event to scrutinize Trump's mental health MORE (Ky.)

“I've been there a long time,” Yarmuth told The Hill when confirming he supports launching an impeachment inquiry, noting he co-sponsored an impeachment resolution in the last Congress when Republicans controlled the House.

 

Mike Lillis contributed to this list, which was last updated on June 17 at 8:08 p.m.